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DA search terms and symbols

I'm looking at a particular search where they are looking for near hits and, amongst the search terms, excluding to or from certain targets.  eg.  restructur match within 10 characters as well as not to or from T:Joe McSweeney.  Also How many wildcards can you use in a single line before the search is considered malformed?

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What version of DA\EV? You

What version of DA\EV?

You might want to peruse this, it has an informative section on wildcards.

Enterprise Vault Discovery Accelerator Effective Searching White Paper

Article:HOWTO77131  |  Created: 2012-06-12  |  Updated: 2014-02-27  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO77131
 

If you are searching 32 bit indexes you will need at least three character, as noted here:

About the search criteria options

Article:HOWTO58624  |  Created: 2011-08-01  |  Updated: 2013-07-12  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO58624
 

A wildcard search always finds items that match your search criteria and that were archived in Enterprise Vault 10.0 or later. To ensure that the search results also include older matching items that are in your archives, enter at least three other characters before the wildcard. For example, the following search string returns hits for the words "make", "maker", "making", "wonder", "wondering", and so on:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/awsterling/

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10 Replies

Also does to or from include

Also does to or from include copied?

The To field will included

The To field will included CC'd and Bcc'd users.

The downside for you will be the NEAR operation.  For DA, the NEAR operator isn't as robust as you needs. The NEAR operator will find items within 50 words of each other.

Searches match items where the words that you specify are within 50 words of each other.

See the following:

Guidelines on using the NEAR operator condition in Discovery Accelerator rules

Article:HOWTO58784  |  Created: 2011-08-01  |  Updated: 2013-07-12  | 

Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO58784

 

About the operators

Article:HOWTO58772  |  Created: 2011-08-01  |  Updated: 2013-07-12  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO58772
 

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/awsterling/

Thank you for pointing out

Thank you for pointing out the operators.  However I was not so much looking for words near each other in terms of proximiy but in likeness; similar words rather than having to define the first three and follow it with a wildcard.  Which, by the by, can you search for keywords of only one or two characters?

Accepted Solution!

What version of DA\EV? You

What version of DA\EV?

You might want to peruse this, it has an informative section on wildcards.

Enterprise Vault Discovery Accelerator Effective Searching White Paper

Article:HOWTO77131  |  Created: 2012-06-12  |  Updated: 2014-02-27  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO77131
 

If you are searching 32 bit indexes you will need at least three character, as noted here:

About the search criteria options

Article:HOWTO58624  |  Created: 2011-08-01  |  Updated: 2013-07-12  |  Article URL http://www.symantec.com/docs/HOWTO58624
 

A wildcard search always finds items that match your search criteria and that were archived in Enterprise Vault 10.0 or later. To ensure that the search results also include older matching items that are in your archives, enter at least three other characters before the wildcard. For example, the following search string returns hits for the words "make", "maker", "making", "wonder", "wondering", and so on:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/awsterling/

View solution in original post

Tony is correct in that DA

Tony is correct in that DA requires at least 3 characters in front of a wild card before the wild card usage is valid.  This is currently regardless of the EV and DA versions.

The only exception to this rule is in DA 9.0.5 or earlier versions or 10.0.4CHF1 or later where we can simulate a 'near' search by using space delimited wild cards to designate words separating words.  For example, to find the word litigation within 2 words of the word action, the criteria would be

litigation action

action litigation

litigation * action

action * litigation

litigation * * action

action * * litigation

The number of asterisk wild cards determines how many words can separate the 'seed' words.  Be careful how many iterations you use, though, as the more iterations, the more complex the search critiera become.

Also note that using the asterisk wild card denotes the number of words, not characters, that can separate the 'seed' words.  If you want to limit the number of characters, you'd need to use the question mark character (and I've not tested using that wild card in that manner, so I don't know if it works).

 

Hi Ken, Above did you mean DA

Hi Ken,

Above did you mean DA 9.0.5 or later?

DA 9.0.5 or earlier versions

Cheers,

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/awsterling/

No, I meant 9.0.5 or earlier

No, I meant 9.0.5 or earlier (i.e., all of 8.0 and 9.0).  There was an issue with the EV 10 64-bit indexing implementation where the decision was made to not support this type of 'near' searching.  We had enough customers relying on that type of searching that Engineering reversed their decision and implemented the ability to conduct this type of searching in 10.0.4CHF1 - I think. I can't seem to find the documentation stating when we got this ability back in the EV 10 stream, but I know it's there in at least 10.0.4CHF1, maybe even 10.0.4 (base).

 

 

Gotcha!  Thanks for the

Gotcha!  Thanks for the explaination.


Cheers,

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/awsterling/

I'm assuming the search

I'm assuming the search string with the * for words needs to be in quotes.

Correct.  Each search string

Correct.  Each search string with the wild cards representing words needs to be surrounded by double quotes.  Be sure to enter these through Notepad or directly into the criteria fields so as to not use smart quotes to surround the 'phrase'.